• 06:00-10:00

    Weekend Breakfast 06:00-10:00

    • Mercedes

      Mercedes Kreissel is a politics, philosophy, and economics student at The University of Stellenbosch. She is a fun loving and bubbly person who enjoys all sports, especially golf and cricket. She is people person who loves all animals- especially a good pupper. Mercedes loves a good pun, and believes a daily dose of banter is sure to turn any frown upside down.

      Read More
    • Olona

      Olona is passionate about Youth, Leadership and Education. She loves in learning new things, meeting people and exploring nature. Two words to describe her personality are Fierce and compassionate (with an abundance of energy). Her favorite quote: Be the change that you want to see in the world. Olona is also passionate about making a difference and touching the lives of everyone she meets. On a day off she enjoys reading, singing and spending time with loved ones (lots of laughter).

      Read More
  • 12:00-14:00

    MFM Top 40 12:00-14:00

    • Hunter

      Hunter studied drama, then honours in media & production, but always had a heavy passion for sport. A great Saturday to her will be sport in the morning, picnic/braai in the afternoon, theatre at night. #sportXentertainment

      Read More
  • 19:00-21:00

    The Way Up 19:00-21:00

    • Kerona

      Kerona is a laid back hip hop enthusiast from Johannesburg with a passion for all things in the arts and entertainment. Majoring in Visual Communication and Design at Stellenbosch University, so being unconventional is nothing new.

      Read More
  • Weekend Drive

    • Alundrah

      Alundrah believes in sharing inspirational stories and encouraging everyone to reach for their dreams. This multifaceted presenter can break down the latest news stories around the world and still offer her opinion on celebrity gossip while moving to good music. Ever the friendly girl next door, you will be drawn to her voice of reason in any conversation as she gives sound advice, laughs often and shares her personal journey; no topic is off limits when Alundrah is on air.

      Read More
    • Andre

      I study PPE (Politics, Philosophy and Economics) at Stellenbosch University. Music is something I am extremely passionate about. I am an Arsenal fan and watching Premier League Football is one of my favourite hobbies. Three words that would describe me quite well are kind, honest and loyal.

      Read More
    • Stephan

      Stephen is a plate of fact, fun and laughter. He loves motivating others, loves giving his opinion, giving advise (even if it's sometimes bad advice, but hey it adds to passion for entertainment) and always aspire to be an escape clause from life's harshest moments while making you feel as best as can one flow joke at a time.

      Read More

Jacob Collier

Jacob Collier
Release date
01 January 1970
Jacob Collier
01 January 1970 |

Jacob Collier first attracted attention with endearing homemade music videos that feature his versions of classic songs by Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and others. Now 21, the multi-instrumentalist is seen in his family’s well-stocked music room, playing every instrument. The short clips use split and multiple screens to highlight each of the (many) parts; here’s Jacob smacking the snare drum, and there’s another Jacob, across the room, snapping out a funk bassline.

The best of these, like the “PYT” video that’s had more than 300,000 views, are entertaining primers in the art of multi-tracking, sometimes involving eight Jacob Collier voices in glorious, Creamsicle-hued harmony. They’re also exercises in music-geek showmanship: chances to watch as an unfathomably talented kid tears apart a beloved hit, modulates into a distant key just for a momentary chuckle, adds extra beats to confuse dancers, and drops devious jazz-piano science between verses.

There’s a thin line between genius and gimmickry. Collier’s debut album, In My Room, walks right up to it, peers out into the Valley Of Random Shredding, and then tiptoes back to the tasteful side. The title track is a faithful rendering of the Beach Boys classic, and though the voice chorale features some slyly disruptive interior tension, the mood of plush, daydreaming introspection prevails. This is the one to play for your Four Freshmen-loving grandfather and your glee-club pal who can’t get enough of Take 6.

Elsewhere, Collier changes the character and tone of his singing voice to suit his original material: He delivers the opening track, “Woke Up Today,” as a Bootsy-schooled funk crusader, shifts into a believable tone of sullen introspection to sing the gorgeous “Hideaway,” then glances at D’Angelo for the falsetto-kissed “Down The Line” and a brilliant episodic glide called “Saviour” that finds him rushing some phrases and placing others radically behind the beat. (The video for that one, shot in a continuous take, shows that Collier’s visual concept has evolved quickly.)

Collier’s vocals are showy and scene-stealing in a musical-theater way, but his exuberance is not that of a stage pro: Running through the singing and all the overdubbing that supports it is a palpable sense of play and discovery. Most of the time, the assembled tracks sound incredibly loose, governed by leap-of-faith ad-libs and happy accidents. Sure, his approach to music-making demands planning, but Collier isn’t a slave to the script: Dive in and listen on a granular level to any individual part, and you’ll hear unrestrained joy running right alongside whatever crazy chops and meta stuff is going on.

That’s the thing about Collier: His music operates on multiple levels at once. His sound is all happy showbiz dazzle on top, while underneath, in the boiler room, he’s conjuring Steve Reich and Frank Zappa. His tunes are rooted in stunning, opulent, proudly consonant chords, but sometimes they take sudden left turns into terrifying dissonance. He’s daring and calculating all at once — a child of the Internet who darts from one magical idea to the next, sometimes abandoning hypnotic grooves before they’ve even fully coalesced. Above all, Collier’s got an agile, fully alive musical mind and a distinct sound and, perhaps most importantly, the willingness to take chances. Listening to his sometimes dizzying debut, you get the sense that he could go in any direction and succeed. Or, at the very least, create something interesting.

Review by NPR @ https://www.npr.org/2016/06/23/482809010/first-listen-jacob-collier-in-my-room